As the year comes to an end, I look back to the books I read this year. First of all I am really happy I met, no, surpassed my goal of reading 45 books by actually reading 51 books.

To say that it was difficult choosing 10 books out of the beautiful bunch would be an understatement. It was gruelling and arduous. Many times I almost gave up because I CAN’T CHOOSE BETWEEN MY BABIES!! But after weeks of deliberation and indecision, here are the top 10 reads of 2017 (not in order).

1) EM AND THE BIG HOOM by Jerry Pinto

“I wasn’t sure I would ever be able to deal with the world. It seemed too big and demanding and there was no fixed syllabus.”

In a one-bedroom-hall-kitchen in Mahim, Bombay, through the last decades of the twentieth century, lived four love-battered Mendeses: mother, father, son and daughter. Between Em, the mother, driven frequently to hospital after her failed suicide attempts, and The Big Hoom, the father, trying to hold things together as best he could, they tried to be a family. Goodreads: Em and the Big Hoom


“Atticus, he was real nice.”

“Most people are, Scot, when you finally see them.”

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic. Goodreads: To Kill A Mockingbird

3) MACBETH by William Shakespeare

“By the prickling of my thumb,

Something wicked this way comes.”

Goodreads: Macbeth

4) WONDER by R. J. Palacio

I think there should be a rule that everyone in the world should get a standing ovation at least once in their lives.”

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He’s about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances? Goodreads: Wonder


“Basically, no one’s really counted the dead. You can always bargain with the statistics. Give or take. Give or take. You know?”

A beautifully drawn graphic novel that illuminates the conflicted land of Kashmir, through a young boy’s childhood.
Seven-year-old Munnu is growing up in Indian-administered Kashmir. Life revolves around his family: Mama, Papa, sister Shahnaz, brothers Adil and Akhtar and, his favourite, older brother Bilal. It also revolves around Munnu’s two favourite things – sugar and drawing.

Munnu is an amazingly personal insight into everyday life in Kashmir. Closely based on Malik Sajad’s own childhood and experiences, it is a beautiful, evocatively drawn graphic novel that questions every aspect of the Kashmir situation – the faults and responsibilities of every side, the history of the region, the role of Britain and the West, the possibilities for the future. It opens up the story of this contested and conflicted land, while also giving a brilliantly close, funny and warm-hearted portrait of a boy’s childhood and coming-of-age. Goodreads: Munnu: A boy from Kashmir

6) HAMLET by William Shalespeare

“One may smile, and smile, and still be a villain.”

Goodreads: Hamlet


“Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing.”

Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author’s most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray’s moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel’s corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, “a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.” Goodreads: The Picture of Dorian Gray


“Imagination was a dangerously captivating magic for those compelled to be realistic in life, and words could be poisonous for those destined always to be silenced.”

In her second novel written in English, Elif Shafak confronts her country’s violent past in a vivid and colorful tale set in both Turkey and the United States. At its center is the “bastard” of the title, Asya, a nineteen-year-old woman who loves Johnny Cash and the French Existentialists, and the four sisters of the Kazanci family who all live together in an extended household in Istanbul: Zehila, the zestful, headstrong youngest sister who runs a tattoo parlor and is Asya’s mother; Banu, who has newly discovered herself as a clairvoyant; Cevriye, a widowed high school teacher; and Feride, a hypochondriac obsessed with impending disaster. Their one estranged brother lives in Arizona with his wife and her Armenian daughter, Armanoush. When Armanoush secretly flies to Istanbul in search of her identity, she finds the Kazanci sisters and becomes fast friends with Asya. A secret is uncovered that links the two families and ties them to the 1915 Armenian deportations and massacres. Full of vigorous, unforgettable female characters, The Bastard of Istanbul is a bold, powerful tale that will confirm Shafak as a rising star of international fiction. Goodreads: The Bastard of Istanbul

9) THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN by Paula Hawkins

“I have never understood how people can blithely disregard the damage they do by following their hearts.”

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she’s only watched from afar. Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train.. Goodreads: The Girl on the Train


“Instinct is a marvellous thing. It can neither be explained nor ignored.”

In her first published mystery, Agatha Christie introduces readers to the heroic detective, Hercule Poirot. This is a classic murder mystery set in the outskirts of Essex. The victim is the wealthy mistress of Styles Court. The list of suspects is long and includes her gold-digging new spouse and stepsons, her doctor, and her hired companion. Goodreads: The Mysterious Affair at Styles



“Remember this! It is never an entire people who is cruel; it is merely individuals who exert their will on others.”

In 1930, a great ocean wave blots out a Bengali village, leaving only one survivor, a young girl. As a maidservant in a British boarding school, Pom is renamed Sarah and discovers her gift for languages. Her private dreams almost die when she arrives in Kharagpur and is recruited into a secretive, decadent world. Eventually, she lands in Calcutta, renames herself Kamala, and creates a new life rich in books and friends. But although success and even love seem within reach, she remains trapped by what she is . . . and is not. As India struggles to throw off imperial rule, Kamala uses her hard-won skills—for secrecy, languages, and reading the unspoken gestures of those around her—to fight for her country’s freedom and her own happiness. Goodreads: The Sleeping Dictionary



So I have seen a lot of BookTubers and bloggers do this tag, and it seemed kind of fun! So I decided to give this a go. Here are 25 bookish facts about me:

1.  I have grown up surrounded by books. Almost everyone in my family loves to read. And my parents would just sit me on their laps and read me fantasy stories. And I owned piles of picture books and short stories collections. Talk about #familygoals, right?

2. The first real novel that I read (not picture book) was the Book of Humor by Ruskin Bond.  I met the man himself when I was in class 3, one summer holiday when we went to Dehradun in Uttarakhand, India. The first novel I ever read was a signed one!! And it is my most prized possession till date.

3. I didn’t read Harry Potter until I was 15. I spent my time dreaming, not of Hogwarts, but Narnia. FOR NARNIA!! FOR ASLAN!!

4. I proudly announce that I JUDGE BOOKS BY THEIR COVERS. Honestly, who doesn’t? If you say you don’t, you’re lying.

5. I used to enjoy reading YA but not anymore. If I come across one more book about a strong, independent female lead, stuck in a complicated love triangle, and single-handedly leading a revolution against a tyrannical ruler, I…I will BANG MY HEAD ON THE WALL. I’m just tired of all this, you know? Spare me the cliches! _/\_

6. I don’t buy that many books. I rarely buy physical books. I currently have membership of 3 libraries, excluding my college library. Also, I own a Kindle (I know, I know, it’s a disputed device. But when you HAVE to have access to books ALWAYS, and your backpack is already so damn heavy, IT’S EASIER TO TAKE A KINDLE TO COLLEGE!) Also, audiobooks are such a blessing.

7. I still enjoy reading children’s books time and again. Enid Blyton, Ruskin Bond, RK Narayan, Roald Dahl. Also, Amar Chitra Kathas are love ❤

8. I am NEVER reading just one book. “Oh yeah, this one I rented from the library” “This one I own, for a change” “This one’s on my Kindle” “I’m currently listening to that one” Like what?

9. I never dog-ear a book or write on one. I use sticky tabs before, but not anymore, it was time consuming to put tabs, and kind of kill the moment especially when I am already engrossed by what was happening in the book I am reading.

10. The first classic I ever read was Heidi (It was ABRIDGED.. A PICTURE BOOK) (The horror) Since it was abridged, I didn’t like it AT ALL. Then years later, I saw the unabridged version while browsing through the library. And that was when I realized how stupid I was. when I read it, I found that Heidi is a pretty amazing book! Other abridged versions that have deceived me are Hound of Baskervilles, Treasure Island and Oliver Twist.

11. I don’t have a favourite genre. I like reading fantasy, adventure, mystery/thriller, contemporary, horror, historical fiction. The only genre I am sick of is paranormal romance (and also the #badboy romances. cringe)

12. Cracked spines make me want to cry.

13.I am a pro at reading in  a moving vehicle and reading while walking. I get a lot of looks of horror for that from people at college, but what can I say? *shrug*

14. I always take a book, wherever I go. Even if there is no chance that I’ll be able to read. But it gives me a kind of comfort just to have one with me at all times.

15. I love making and collecting bookmarks. Although most of the time I just grab anything I can get my hand on (i.e. comb)

16. I sometimes get sick of reading and I don’t read anything for months on an end. Shameful, I know.

17. I am a book sniffer. I love the smell of books, regardless of the fact whether they are new or old. I get high on the smell of books.

18. I love to feel the yellowing paper of old books. I know it’s weird, but that’s just who I am. When I was younger I used to imagine that hardback books with yellowing pages were secret spell books from fantasy books. (I know I am super weird.)

19. The first Harry Potter book that I read was Chamber of Secrets.

20. Whenever people ask me for book recommendations, I generally just forget all the books I ever read and look at them with a blank expression. Ahh.. It’s so frustrating.

21.I love reading classics, unlike a lot of readers. What can I say, I just love the feeling of Old English words in my mouth.

22. I love it when books have maps in them. It makes my heart all giddy giddy.

23. I hardly read any non-fiction. Just can’t focus while reading them. Also I CANNOT understand the obsession over all those “inspirational” books. I enjoy reading biographies though. And as a matter of fact, the book I am currently reading IS an autobiography – Dreams of My Father by Barack Obama. (It’s a self narrated audio-book. And can I just say that Barack Obama is an amazing orator!!!!) (fun fact: This audiobook won a Grammy for spoken word. I DID NOT KNOW THEY HAVE GRAMMYS FOR SPOKEN WORD! Also, Obama is a Grammy winner? wow.)

24. I am not obsessed with the organisation of my books. I just keep my books in whatever way they can all fit in the small space, stacked, double stacked, on top of each other, ANYTHING.

25. I get so emotionally attached with all the books and fictional characters I read. I stay in book hangover for days after I finish reading a really good book.

Book Review: Em and the Big Hoom by Jerry Pinto

It’s a book dealing with a scary subject, mental illness. The narrator of the book lives in a one bedroom house with his depressed, beedhi smoking mother, Em, who is frequently rushed to the hospital because of her repeated suicide attempts, dependable father, the Big Hoom, who tries to hold the family together as best as he can, and quite elder sister, Susan. This books paints a painful picture of the lives of a depressed person and her dysfunctional family. 

This is one of those books that touch you so profoundly that you just sit there, staring at the last words and gently caressing the page, everything else forgotten. 

At times it was so difficult to believe that this is fiction, not a memoir, for the emotions were so deep and so real. This books twists your insides and forms lumps in your throat, but leaves a warm glow in your heart when you finally finish it. 

It is going to take some time to recover from the hangover this book has given me.

Everyone should read this!



My soul is a library that screams out me.
Within its caring, loving shelves,
It holds the story that is me.
There are books old and yellowing;
There are books unwritten, waiting to be opened;
There are books I read over for old time’s sake.
These hold stories unspoken,
The things they make me.
Would you read through me
Or would you leave the pages half read?
Oh, but hold these books with tender hands,
For they hold treasures within;
These books hold memories,
They hold people in them.
Some people are simply sentences,
Others own complete books.
They all make me, shape me;
Their inky marks adore my soul.
Would you roam into the darkest corners of my library?
Would you blow the dust off and read?
I sure am writing you down, my friend,
But my dear, would you write down me?


Harry Potter doodle



Harry Potter!! ❤ :* Love. Love. Love.




Horrible Science: : Shocking ElectricityHorrible Science: Killer EnergyHorrible Science Fatal Forces

Horrible Science Sounds Dreadful

Science cannot remain boring and dry and difficult and mind-numbing  if you read the “Horrible Science” Books. The Horrible Science Series is a wonderful collection written by NICK ARNOLD and illustrated by TONY DE SAULLES.

 I have till now read 8of the 28 Horrible Science books like BLOOD, BONES AND BODY BITS ( About our body); CHEMICAL CHAOS (about Chemistry); SHOCKING ELECTRICITY (About electricity); KILLER ENERGY(About energy); FATAL FORCES (About force); SOUNDS DREADFUL(About sound) ; REALLY ROTTEN EXPERIMENTS and FRIGHTING LIGHT (About light and optics).  I love them so much that I wish to read the rest of them too.

The books are written in an interesting, funny, attention-grabbing way by Nick Arnold. The books contain loads and loads of important, amazing and some really horrible facts written in a humorous manner. It makes concepts come alive and shows that science is actually very DRAMATIC. For example when we are reading about our body, the author does not simply list the various organs. Using the story of Frankenstein, he gives us “Instructions” about how to go about creating our owm Monster. That way gives the details of all the important and vital components of our body. I particularly liked the way he described our skin as the birthday suite which comes in various shades and colours. It is such a fantastic suite that repairs itself, grows with us is an armor that protects us from harmful germs and prevents damage by harmful sun rays. It is even sensitive to temperature!!! and adjusts itself according to temperature. Whew!! so much the skin does!!!



Image Source:

I can bet that you do not know which is the heaviest organ in our body!!…..try try…take a guess   🙂 🙂 🙂 …Ok… now don’t cheat….and tell me truthfully what is your answer. Now I will tell you the correct answer is …. our skin!!! Yes, it is such a thin part of our body and yet it the heaviest organ!!! Amazing, isn’t it? 🙂

I read these books thoroughly and ask my parents some astounding questions like “Which is the organ of the body which has no pain receptor ie, the organ which can feel no pain?……Brain!!!! I love it when they are not able to answer my questions. :mrgreen: Information like that makes science interesting! Books like this are great for students because they show students that science is truly interesting and amazing! While these books appear, at first glance, to be quiz/comic/joke books, they’re really full of important and useful information that is also found in regular textbooks. 

The illustrations done by Tony De Saulles add a real finishing touch to the mind-bending books. The book jokes about homework and teachers. The books contain quizzes that make you run through your memory lane and remember the answers that you have so far learnt. The quizzes are really interesting and may bend your brain.

I would like to recommend this series to al those who are having hitch in Science or hate the subject / teacher. For those who are finding it difficult to do Maths or understand History then there is the series of MURDEROUS MATHS and HORRIBLE HISTORY.